Felix Irving Rogers 1843-1931

My great great grandfather, Felix Irving Rogers, born 19 Dec. 1843 in Kentucky and died 23 Sept., 1931 in Blair Oklahoma.

Grandma, Jennie Manley Rogers Rector Baney, called him ‘Grandpap’. He married at least four times and had twelve children.

1st  marriage: Mary Polly Sandlin (1844-1873) five children were born to this marriage: Levi M. (1863-1958), Margaret Elizabeth (1865-1900), George Washington (1867-1907), Kannada (1870-1951), and James Palestine Rogers (1871-1930).

2nd marriage 1874: Eliza Bartley born 1857.

3rd marriage: Lucinda Baker, my great great grandmother, (born about 1848) two children were born to this marriage: Charles Azariah Rogers, my great grandfather, (1876-1966) and Enoch Jasper Rogers (1880-1867).

4th and last marriage: Mattie Adams (1865-1947), five children were born to this marriage: Governor M (1888-1918), Daniel Irvin (1891-1921), Ruth (1894-1993), Perander B (1896-1918), and Simpson Rogers (1899-1976).

Felix Irving Rogers and Mattie Adams Rogers
Felix Irving Rogers and Mattie Adams Rogers
Back
About 1904 Back row, left to right: Enock, Governor, Charles Isaac, middle row, Ruth, Mattie, Grandpap, Dan, front row, Simpson and Perander
1915 Rogers Christmas Dinner Thanks to Melbie Smith for this picture
1915 Rogers Christmas Dinner Thanks to Melbie Smith for this picture
Grandpap with sons Charles and Simpson
Grandpap with sons Charles and Simpson
1917 Grandpap with five of seven sons.
1917 Grandpap with five of seven sons.
Grandma visits Grandpap's grave
Grandma visits Grandpap’s grave

As told to me by Grandma, Jennie Manley Rogers Rector Baney, ‘Grandpap was a hell fire and brimstone Baptist preacher. A strict man, he could be very scary. I was a little girl but remember Grandpap locking Uncle Governor in the shed. I could hear Uncle Governor yelling and beating on the door for someone to let him out. Grandpap didn’t take to any of the boys drinking.’ 

I asked her if all of Grandpap’s wives died, she said, ‘If they didn’t die, he just quit em.’

I also asked Grandma about Lucinda Baker, Felix 3rd wife, our direct relative. She told me that she wasn’t sure what happened to her Grandmother. All she knew was that she died young. I believe Lucinda was born 1858 in Kentucky to Enoch and Eleanor Baker. I wish I knew more about Lucinda. If anyone has information, I would love to know more about her.

WWI, Brothers by Birth and Brothers in Arms, Story of Love and Sacrifice

Gov & Per Rogers
Brothers, Govenor & Perander Rogers WWI
Felix Irving Rogers and Sons 1917
Grandpap with sons.

A heartbreaking story of love and sacrifice. WWI, two of Grandpap’s (Felix Irving Rogers) sons die in France in the Battle of Chateau-Thierry 18 July, 1918. Thanks to cousin Melbie Smith for the following story of Grandpap’s struggle to bring his son’s bodies home.

Rogers Family 1921
After three years, Grandpap was able to bring his son’s remains home.

 

Flag Drapped Caskets of Gov and Per
Grandpap buries his sons.

The Love of Sons and Country

Governor and his brother Per (Perander B.) were in Co. D, 111th Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, during World War I. They were both killed in the war and the record of the return of their bodies contains 76 pages in the National Archives in Washington D.C.. In July 1917 the young men registered and were given a serial number. Their numbers were submitted to a drawing to see who would go to war.  Governor’s number was 638, Per’s was 642 and their brother Dan’s was 640.  When the drawing was made Per’s number was in the first draft, and afterward, Governor volunteered. (he wasn’t going to let his brother go alone).The night before the local boys left for army training at Camp Travis, San Antonio, Texas, a celebration honoring them was held at the Blair Baptist Church with over a thousand people from the surrounding countryside in attendance. Professor J. L.  Jessie was in charge of the program. After the audience sang “America” the boys proceeded down the aisle to the center of the church to seats reserved for them.  Ice cream cones were sold, raising $40.00 for the boys to use for things the army menu did not provide. There were ten young men honored, including Governor and Per. They left home 19 September 1917, and arrived at Camp Davis on the 20th. In a letter to the newspaper they wrote:

“We find it altogether different to what we were expecting.  We are well satisfied and having a nice time. We are seen after and cared for as well as in our own homes We have met several of our friends since we arrived here.”  “We find it one of the greatest educations a man can persue.” 

Governor and Per each wrote again after the Allies retaking of Chateau-Thierry from the Germans on 21 July 1918, saying that their company was one of the first to cross the Mame River in that engagement.  Their letters were published in the newspaper. The clipping was found in the papers of the Felix Rogers family.  The name of the newspaper and the date  were not with the clipping.  In the letters they expressed confidence that the war would soon be over and they would return home.  It was not to be, as they were both killed 12 August. Per was wounded by sniper fire and as Governor was helping him back to their lines, a shell burst nearby, killing both of them instantly.  They were buried 21 Aug. at Fimes, France, near Reims, by Chaplain Wolf of the 109th Infantry.  They were reburied in American Battlefield Cemetery No. 18 near Fimes on 11 Nov.  Governor was in Row H, No. 203 and Per was in Row H, No.204.  Both hand their heads shattered and could not be identified by dental records.  They were identified by pocket knives that they carried with their name and home town inscribed on them. Details of the death of Governor and Per was given by First Sergeant Martin Sullivan of their company.Felix and Mattie received a letter from Mr. Sullivan of Pittsburgh, Penn. written 9 July 1919 in response to a letter they had written to him asking how their boys had died and how they could get their personal effects back.Sullivan said that they were being relieved by another regiment when a high explosive shell killed them both. There was no time to bury them that day, because the shell fire was to severe and a great many men had been killed. He said, the following day the Chaplain of the 109th Reg. sent word to their Captain that he had buried both of the boys. Sullivan suggested Felix get in touch with the local Red Cross to get help with applying for back pay and in having the personal effects sent home.   The Company Commander was Lt. Col. Franklin P. Haller of Media, Penn.   W.T. Jeter of Magnum helped the Rogers’ in finding people who had known their sons. He forwarded a letter to them from Joe A. Logan of Milton, Penn. saying that the boys were personal friends of himself and had won the hearts of every man in the company.  Logan was with them when they died. He said the had been relieved and were returning to the rear when a sniper hit one of the boys in the leg.  The other brother went back to help him, but a shell dropped and killed them both. Logan had been wounded  and had written to the Rogers when in the hospital, but he assumed they never received his letter.   Felix received a letter , written 31 Oct 1918, from Brother R. Fred Burt of the office of the superintendent  of the Medford, Okla. public schools, addressed, simply, “Grandpa Rogers, Blair, Okla.  Mr. Burt tried to cheer them by reminding them that the boys were “Liberty Laddies” and that they were standing on the verge of the inauguration of the “Millennial Kingdom”  On 16 Feb. 1919 the Blair Baptist Church and Sunday School held a memorial meeting for the purpose of paying last respects to Governor and Per and extending sympathies to the parents and relatives of the fallen heroes.

The color of two of the stars on the church service flag were changed from blue to gold in their honor.  The flag was lowered and draped in mourning for 30 days.  In Feb. 1919 Felix received information from Graves Registration Service, Office of the Quartermaster General.  The bodies of the war dead that could be identified could remain in Europe and be buried in a permanent American Cemetery, be brought back to the United States and buried in Arlington or any other National Cemetery or be brought back to the United States and returned to the family for burial. Felix replied with the following letter on the 18th:

“As I had letter telling me whare one of my sones was buried Pvt. Per B. Rogers and you did not tell me whare my other one was layed  so let me thank you for the information of that one and ask you pleas tell me if you can whare Pvt Gov M. Rogers Co. D 111th Inf A.E.F. was burried as I am so anxious to no.  They were both killed 12th of  August 1918.  Eny information in reguard to them will be much appreciated bye his mother and father and will there bodys be sent back home?  Oh, how I do wount the bodys sent to me.  I saw in your letter they would be sent sometime.”  He wrote again on the twenty-fifth: “I have written so many letters trying to find out something in reguard to my dear boy’s effects.  There names was Gov M. Rogers and Per B. Rogers.  Both belonged to Co. D, 111 Inf.  Will you pleas let me no if you can about them.  One of them had a watch and fountain pen and a knife with his name on it ‘Gov M. Rogers’  The other one had a ring and a fountain pen and a knife with his name ‘Per B. Rogers’  And pleas if there bodies are sent to the United States send my poor boys to me.  They were both killed August the 12 so we was told.  Please send all the information you can.”  He wrote again 24 March: ” I am wrighting in reguard to the body of my too dear boys.  I rec. a card today asking me if I wounted the body of Per B. Rogers.  If I can get the body of his brother Gov. Mc. Rogers also I wount them both but if I can’t get both it would hurt me so bad to leave one over thare. Rite at once and tell me if both will be sent.  I would like to have them bothe in the same casket if posable.  They both was in Co. D 111 Inf never was sepreated while in servis and please don’t sepperate them now. They were both killed August 12, 1918 so the telegram said.  I hope I am not asking to much.. Let me no if Gov. Mc. Rogers Co. D 111 Inf will be sent.” 

Felix received a reply assuring him that both sons bodies would be sent home, but it could not be promised that they would arrive in the United States at the same time.  Two years of paperwork and preparation followed.  The bodies were dis interred in France 4 April 1921 and sent to Antwerp, Belgium where they were put on board the U.S. Army Transport “Wheaton” on the 26th arriving at Hoboken,  N.J. 18 May. On 9 June Special Orders No. 136 was issued appointing Cpl. William B Saltine and Pfc. Joseph Murphy to escort seventy three bodies by rail from Hoboken, N.J. to Little Rock, Ark., to be further distributed to destinations in Ark., Olka., Tex., La., Kan., and Mo.The names of Gov. Mc. and Per B. Rogers were on the list. Their father was informed of the preparations and the bodies were sent from Hoboken 11 June with the designated escort.  Felix acknowledged receipt of the remains and burial permits on the fourteenth.  The bodies were taken to their father’s home prior to their funeral and burial at Blair Cemetery,on the 23rd. The American Legion was in charge of the outdoor funeral service  with the assistanceof the Boy Scouts.  Military honors were conferred  as a last touch of sympathy and honor to their comrades and taps were sounded as the bodies were lowered into their graves.  Both Governer, Certificate 100747 and Perander, Certificate 100357 were insured by Woodmen of the World Life Insurance Society.  Since both death claims were paid in 1919 the applications for membership and copies of death certificates are no longer part of the companies records 13 August 1993.

Blair Oklahoma
Blair, Oklahoma – Waiting for the train to bring hometown heroes home.
Hometown Pays Respect
Blair, Oklahoma morns hometown sons lost in battle

DSC00298

Gov & Per obit
Govenor and Perander Rogers Obituary

Governor and his brother Per (Perander B.) were in Co. D, 111th Infantry, American Expeditionary Forces, during World War I. They were both killed in the war and the record of the return of their bodies contains 76 pages in the National Archives in Washington D.C.. In July 1917 the young men registered and were given a serial number. Their numbers were submitted to a drawing to see who would go to war.  Governor’s number was 638, Per’s was 642 and their brother Dan’s was 640.  When the drawing was made Per’s number was in the first draft, and afterward, Governor volunteered. (he wasn’t going to let his brother go alone).The night before the local boys left for army training at Camp Travis, San Antonio, Texas, a celebration honoring them was held at the Blair Baptist Church with over a thousand people from the surrounding countryside in attendance. Professor J. L.  Jessie was in charge of the program. After the audience sang “America” the boys proceeded down the aisle to the center of the church to seats reserved for them.  Ice cream cones were sold, raising $40.00 for the boys to use for things the army menu did not provide. There were ten young men honored, including Governor and Per. They left home 19 September 1917, and arrived at Camp Davis on the 20th. In a letter to the newspaper they wrote: “We find it altogether different to what we were expecting.  We are well satisfied and having a nice time. We are seen after and cared for as well as in our own homes We have met several of our friends since we arrived here.”  “We find it one of the greatest educations a man can persue.”  Governor and Per each wrote again after the Allies retaking of Chateau-Thierry from the Germans on 21 July 1918, saying that their company was one of the first to cross the Mame River in that engagement.  Their letters were published in the newspaper. The clipping was found in the papers of the Felix Rogers family.  The name of the newspaper and the date  were not with the clipping.  In the letters they expressed confidence that the war would soon be over and they would return home.  It was not to be, as they were both killed 12 August. Per was wounded by sniper fire and as Governor was helping him back to their lines, a shell burst nearby, killing both of them instantly.  They were buried 21 Aug. at Fimes, France, near Reims, by Chaplain Wolf of the 109th Infantry.  They were reburied in American Battlefield Cemetery No. 18 near Fimes on 11 Nov.  Governor was in Row H, No. 203 and Per was in Row H, No.204.  Both hand their heads shattered and could not be identified by dental records.  They were identified by pocket knives that they carried with their name and home town inscribed on them. Details of the death of Governor and Per was given by First Sergeant Martin Sullivan of their company.Felix and Mattie received a letter from Mr. Sullivan of Pittsburgh, Penn. written 9 July 1919 in response to a letter they had written to him asking how their boys had died and how they could get their personal effects back.Sullivan said that they were being relieved by another regiment when a high explosive shell killed them both. There was no time to bury them that day, because the shell fire was to severe and a great many men had been killed. He said, the following day the Chaplain of the 109th Reg. sent word to their Captain that he had buried both of the boys. Sullivan suggested Felix get in touch with the local Red Cross to get help with applying for back pay and in having the personal effects sent home.   The Company Commander was Lt. Col. Franklin P. Haller of Media, Penn.   W.T. Jeter of Magnum helped the Rogers’ in finding people who had known their sons. He forwarded a letter to them from Joe A. Logan of Milton, Penn. saying that the boys were personal friends of himself and had won the hearts of every man in the company.  Logan was with them when they died. He said the had been relieved and were returning to the rear when a sniper hit one of the boys in the leg.  The other brother went back to help him, but a shell dropped and killed them both. Logan had been wounded  and had written to the Rogers when in the hospital, but he assumed they never received his letter.   Felix received a letter , written 31 Oct 1918, from Brother R. Fred Burt of the office of the superintendent  of the Medford, Okla. public schools, addressed, simply, “Grandpa Rogers, Blair, Okla.  Mr. Burt tried to cheer them by reminding them that the boys were “Liberty Laddies” and that they were standing on the verge of the inauguration of the “Millennial Kingdom”  On 16 Feb. 1919 the Blair Baptist Church and Sunday School held a memorial meeting for the purpose of paying last respects to Governor and Per and extending sympathies to the parents and relatives of the fallen heroes.  

The color of two of the stars on the church service flag were changed from blue to gold in their honor.  The flag was lowered and draped in mourning for 30 days.  In Feb. 1919 Felix received information from Graves Registration Service, Office of the Quartermaster General.  The bodies of the war dead that could be identified could remain in Europe and be buried in a permanent American Cemetery, be brought back to the United States and buried in Arlington or any other National Cemetery or be brought back to the United States and returned to the family for burial. Felix replied with the following letter on the 18th: “As I had letter telling me whare one of my sones was buried Pvt. Per B. Rogers and you did not tell me whare my other one was layed  so let me thank you for the information of that one and ask you pleas tell me if you can whare Pvt Gov M. Rogers Co. D 111th Inf A.E.F. was burried as I am so anxious to no.  They were both killed 12th of  August 1918.  Eny information in reguard to them will be much appreciated bye his mother and father and will there bodys be sent back home?  Oh, how I do wount the bodys sent to me.  I saw in your letter they would be sent sometime.”  Hewrote again on the twenty-fifth: I have written so many letters trying to find out something in reguard to my dear boy’s effects.  There names was Gov M. Rogers and Per B. Rogers.  Both belonged to Co. D, 111 Inf.  Will you pleas let me no if you can about them.  One of them had a watch and fountain pen and a knife with his name on it “Gov M. Rogers”  The other one had a ring and a fountain pen and a knife with his name “Per B. Rogers”  And pleas if there bodies are sent to the United States send my poor boys to me.  They were both killed August the 12 so we was told.  Please send all the information you can.  He wrote again 24 March: ” I am wrighting in reguard to the body of my too dear boys.  I rec. a card today asking me if I wounted the body of Per B. Rogers.  If I can get the body of his brother Gov. Mc. Rogers also I wount them both but if I can’t get both it would hurt me so bad to leave one over thare. Rite at once and tell me if both will be sent.  I would like to have them bothe in the same casket if posable.  They both was in Co. D 111 Inf never was sepreated while in servis and please don’t sepperate them now. They were both killed August 12, 1918 so the telegram said.  I hope I am not asking to much.. Let me no if Gov. Mc. Rogers Co. D 111 Inf will be sent.”  Felix received a reply assuring him that both sons bodies would be sent home, but it could not be promised that they would arrive in the United States at the same time.  Two years of paperwork and preparation followed.  The bodies were dis interred in France 4 April 1921

and sent to Antwerp, Belgium where they were put on board the U.S. Army Transport “Wheaton” on the 26th arriving at Hoboken,  N.J. 18 May. On 9 June Special Orders No. 136 was issued appointing Cpl. William B Saltine and Pfc. Joseph Murphy to escort seventy three bodies by rail from Hoboken, N.J. to Little Rock, Ark., to be further distributed to destinations in Ark., Olka., Tex., La., Kan., and Mo.The names of Gov. Mc. and Per B. Rogers were on the list. Their father was informed of the preparations and the bodies were sent from Hoboken 11 June with the designated escort.  Felix acknowledged receipt of the remains and burial permits on the fourteenth.  The bodies were taken to their father’s home prior to their funeral and burial at Blair Cemetery,on the 23rd. The American Legion was in charge of the outdoor funeral service  with the assistanceof the Boy Scouts.  Military honors were conferred  as a last touch of sympathy and honor to their comrades and taps were sounded as the bodies were lowered into their graves.  Both Governer, Certificate 100747 and Perander, Certificate 100357 were insured by Woodmen of the World Life Insurance Society.  Since both death claims were paid in 1919 the applications for membership and copies of death certificates are no longer part of the companies records 13 August 1993.